Gay dating acronyms

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The medical literature has been struggling to control the proliferation of acronyms as their use has evolved from aiding communication to hindering it.

This has become such a problem that it is even evaluated at the level of medical academies such as the American Academy of Dermatology.

By 1943, the term acronym had been used in English to recognize abbreviations (and contractions of phrases) that were pronounced as words. Others point out that language change has happened for thousands of years, and argue that it should be embraced as inevitable, or as innovation that adapts the language to changing circumstances.

In English, acronyms pronounced as words may be a 20th-century phenomenon. In this view, the modern practice is just as legitimate as those in "proper" English of the current generation of speakers, such as the abbreviation of corporation names in places with limited writing space (e.g., ticker tape, newspaper column inches).

Ancient examples of acronymy (regardless of whether there was metalanguage at the time to describe it) include the following: During the mid- to late 19th century, an acronym-disseminating trend spread through the American and European business communities: abbreviating corporation names —such as on the sides of railroad cars (e.g., "Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac Railroad" → "RF&P"); on the sides of barrels and crates; and on ticker tape and in the small-print newspaper stock listings that got their data from it (e.g. Some well-known commercial examples dating from the 1890s through 1920s include "Nabisco" ("National Biscuit Company"), "Esso" (from "S. Roosevelt (also of course known as "FDR") under the New Deal.

O.", from "Standard Oil"), and "Sunoco" ("Sun Oil Company"). Business and industry also are prolific coiners of acronyms. Navy, is "COMCRUDESPAC", which stands for "commander, cruisers destroyers Pacific"; it is also seen as "Com Cru Des Pac".

Acronyms flourished especially from the 20th century onwards; the distinction between abbreviation and acronym has been steadily eroded and acronym is commonly used for several types of abbreviation.

Like retronymy, it became much more common in the 20th century than it had formerly been. The armed forces and government agencies frequently employ acronyms; some well-known examples from the United States are among the "alphabet agencies" (also jokingly referred to as "alphabet soup") created by Franklin D.

There are no universal standards for the multiple names for such abbreviations or for their orthographic styling.

Acronyms result from a word formation process known as blending, in which parts of two or more words are combined to form a new word.

The word is colinderies or colinda, an acronym for the Colonial and Indian Exposition held in London in that year." However, although acronymic words seem not to have been employed in general vocabulary before the 20th century (as Wilton points out), the concept of their formation is treated as effortlessly understood (and evidently not novel) in a Poe story of the 1830s, "How to Write a Blackwood Article", which includes the contrived acronym "P. In addition to expansion at first use, some publications also have a key listing all the acronyms used they have used and what their expansions are. The first is that if they are not reading the entire publication sequentially (which is a common mode of reading), then they may encounter an acronym without having seen its expansion.

Having a key at the start or end of the publication obviates skimming over the text searching for an earlier use to find the expansion.

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